Podcast

Podcast Galore

I’ve been hooked on podcasts for close to 10 years. Can’t imagine life without my daily fix. I listen while cooking, emptying the dishwasher, making the bed, before I go to sleep, during walks and workouts and while traveling. Especially while traveling. Tuning in to a podcast on short or long-haul trip is a splendorous way to forget how excruciatingly boring flying is.

I loved listening to radio as a kid and have always seen podcasts as the medium’s natural evolution. It’s basically radio-on-demand but without any of public radio’s ridiculous restrictions and commercial radio’s mind-numbing predictability. And though advertising on podcasts isn’t much different than any other kind of advertising, it’s easy enough to fast-forward and skip ads.

The podcast gamut is widening exponentially and there’s practically a show about any given subject. In my subscription library you’ll find an equal measure of comical and topical podcasts. “Fresh Air” with Terry Gross and the New York Times excellent podcast “The Daily” with Michael Barbaro are just two of a dozen news or “magazine” podcast I listen to with great amusement.

Among my absolute favorite is Conan O’Brien’s’ interview show called, “Conan O’Brien Needs a Friend”. I find listening to Conan is so much funnier than watching his show. He’s like the Jack Benny of podcasting. The latest episode with Martin Short is hysterical and only second to the conversation Conan had with David Sedaris a few months ago where among many topics they chat causally about the perks of going through a colonoscopy.

Not sure most people know this, but the medium’s name “podcast” stems from Apple’s original mp3 player introduced in 2001, the “iPod”. Podcast is basically a semantic amalgamation of what Apple christened the tiny device and an abbreviation of traditional media’s term for mass-distribution > iPod > broadcasting ≈ podcast.

I haven’t owned an iPod in many, many years, but had several iterations, starting with the very first white one with a capacity of roughly 1000 songs and a 10 hour battery life. Just like those old, almost pocketable transistor radios, of which I owned at least one in the late 1970s, it was the combination of the iPod’s enormous capacity, simple functionality and extreme portability that made buying one so irresistible. Not entirely unlike the Sony Walkman, which Steve Jobs, Apple’s co-founder, accordingly to a degree modeled the original iPod after.

My most recent podcast favs include the suspenseful, To Live and Die in L.A. Phil in the Blanks with Doctor Phil and Hidden Brain with NPR’s Shankar Vedantam. I made the above abstract collage earlier this morning.

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